Top Crops

 
 

Find interesting food facts and agriculture statistics on some of the U.S.’s leading crops.

Row Crops

Have you ever wondered where cotton is grown in the United States, or the process it goes through to make your clothing? Find out the process from the field to fabric.

 
Snake River Grill

Planning your garden? Here are nine things you should grow this year.

 
Honeybee Facts

Learn why bees are so important for the agriculture industry and check out more interesting facts about honeybees.

 
Peaches

Peach harvest in the South typically begins around the middle of May and goes through the end of August. Here’s how Georgia peaches go from tree in the orchard to your kitchen for pie, cobbler or ice cream.

 
Farm Facts: Spinach

Did you know that California is the top spinach producing state? Learn more about this nutritious leafy green.

 
Tastier Winter Tomatoes

A better tasting tomato may be available in winter months due to an increase in greenhouse growing.

 
Maine Potatoes

Here’s a look at some interesting facts about the potato, including nutritional and numbers, such as how many are grown to become frozen french fries.

 
Farm Facts about Eggs

Did you know that you can tell whether an egg is fresh or stale by dropping it in water? May is National Egg Month, and we’re celebrating with some fun farm facts about eggs.

 
The U.S. agriculture industry employs 17 percent of the country's workforce.

Agriculture is one of the United States’ most important industries, employing 17 percent of the country’s total work force. Here are fun facts and statistics about U.S. agriculture.

 
United States agriculture soybeans

U.S. farmers in more than 30 states grow soybeans, making soybeans the country’s top value crop export. Find out more soybean facts and stats.

 
Horseradish Roots in Illinois

Horseradish is a member of a venerable botanical family, Brassicaceae, which includes broccoli, cabbage, mustard and wasabi. Read on for more horseradish fun facts.

 
Mint trivia and fun facts

In 2010 the United States produced a whopping 8.6 million pounds of the breath-fresheners. Here are some more fun facts about mint.

 
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