South Carolina ag products [INFOGRAPHIC]

1. Broilers – Broilers, or chicken raised for meat, brought in $960.81 million in 2014. The top earning commodity makes up 59.6 percent of the state’s agricultural cash receipts.

2. Turkeys – This poultry commodity ranks No. 2 in the state. Turkey farmers produce approximately 335 million pounds annually, and earned $318.40 million in 2014.

3. Corn – South Carolina planted a whopping 295,000 acres of corn in 2014. The agricultural staple generated $194.20 million in cash receipts.

4. Cotton – Cotton lint earned $183 million in cash receipts in 2014. South Carolina producers harvested 520,000 bales of cotton in 2014, enough to make 111.8 million pairs of jeans.

5. Greenhouse and nursery – Flowers, trees, shrubs and sod are grown for landscaping and ornamental purposes in South Carolina. The diverse industry brought in $181.94 million in cash receipts in 2014.

6. Cattle and calves – South Carolina cattle and calf inventory was up 1.4 percent at the beginning of 2014. This growing industry generated $150.56 million in cash receipts last year.

7. Soybeans – The 15.4 million bushels of soybeans produced in 2014 are used for food, livestock feed, fuel and other products. This versatile commodity brought in $134.96 million in cash receipts for the state economy.

8. Chicken eggs – South Carolina is one of the top 20 chicken-egg producing states and this commodity earned an impressive $115.53 million in cash receipts for the state’s economy in 2014.

9. Peanuts – In 2014, peanuts generated $112.88 million in cash receipts. South Carolina peanut farmers harvested 1.63 million acres of peanuts in 2014.

See Also:  Farming Diversity in South Carolina

10. Wheat – Used in pasta, bread, cereal and more, wheat earned $83.66 million in cash receipts in 2014. South Carolina producers harvested 2.02 billion bushels, enough for 84.84 billion loaves of white bread.

3 COMMENTS

  1. I am doing research on the current cash crops in South Carolina. I am interested to learn more about the revenues vs expenses of corn, cotton, soybeans, peanuts and wheat. Where would be the best place to look to find this information?

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